Tag Archives: career seekers

CFEC Jobs Initiative Empowers

cfji-logo InitiaveAre you unemployed, underemployed, and/or recently graduated, this FREE six-session program has the potential to lift you well above other candidates. For those serious about career progression and career satisfaction, make the call today at 407.796.3650 or visit www.cfji.org for details.
January 15th concluded the Central Florida Jobs Initiative launch, finding an overwhelming response from all participants. Following up from a previous shout out, Christian HELP, Central Florida Employment Council (CFEC), and Education Career Services partnered with one goal in mind: YOUR CAREER SUCCESS.

Here’s what fellow participants had to say about the empowering sessions:

*  I am ready like I have never been ready before
*  The books were good, organized, and kept me interested
*  All of the instructors cared about our success, that meant a lot
*  I’ve never been so engaged, the value of the sessions went far beyond expectations
*  Role-playing activities will help me understand how to deal with workplace confrontation better
*  Being a single mom without any college, I couldn’t help but feel for Megan. The way you made us see ourselves in the challenges others faced was so valuable. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

The six-session jobs initiative workshop classes are once again scheduled to begin next week. If you are serious about career development, gaining the right job, or learning time-tested and proven employment strategies, contact Christian HELP at 407.796.3650 for details. Interactive classes meet twice a week for three weeks.

Qualifying to be part of this complementary jobs initiative series, is as follows:

*  Must clear a criminal background
*  Must have reliable transportation
*  If applicable, must have reliable childcare
*  Must be eligible to work in the United States
*  Must have a minimum of a high school diploma or GED
Placing you on top with a competitive advantage, I am scheduled to present and guide session #6 on February 13th. Nothing would be better than to have you join me as we explore what it takes to perform well on the job, gain fellow worker and supervisor respect, and set the foundation to gain promotions and job security.

Each of the six workshops is committed to a specific career lifecycle element. Throughout each workshop, you will be introduced to a wide range of career strategies and applications proven to enrich your personal and professional development.

Highlights of the six complementary classes are as follows:

Creating Your Job Search Plan: Addresses effective job search and career management strategies as well as common techniques to overcome the psychological effects when faced with unemployment.

Crafting Your Cover Letter and Resume
: No doubt the key to finding a job is a well-written, value-filled resume and cover letter. Our second of six workshops cover the basic and advanced methods behind writing an effective resume and cover letter, and also provides examples and tips along to the way to YOUR career success.

Networking in the Digital Age: According to a recent study conducted by Harvard University sociologist Mark Granovetter, 74.5% of all jobs come through networking. No doubt networking is a key in success but how does one network effectively? Series three is an ideal guide to get you on the right networking path, and keep you there!

Job Search Tactics: This fourth of six workshops takes you through each step of a digital job search. Everything from selecting an online job search site, creating an online profile, to uploading a resume is covered. Furthermore, alternative methods such as social networking, job fairs, and walk-in’s are detailed.

Interviewing and Impressions: The fifth workshop breaks the interview process into a series of steps. We start with preparation for the big day, move onto the interview, and then cover the follow up. Let this interview workshop be your guide to acing every aspect of the interview by realizing the many values and contributions you offer an employer.

Performance Excellence: The final workshop walks you throughout your 90-day review period and beyond. Be prepared to learn the meaning and process of on-boarding, develop conflict resolution skills, and examine the best practices to give and receive feedback. Furthermore, you’ll be introduced to concepts such as how to handle confidential information and contractual agreements.

Are you ready to be a superstar on the job?

To learn more, go to www.cfji.org for a complete Central Florida Jobs Initiative overview.

Education Career Services is proud to partner with Christian HELP and play an instrumental role in developing and publishing cutting-edge career management material for the Central Florida Jobs Initiative as well as thousands of job seekers across the United States. For those interested in career management courseware, full length books, or employment-targeted booklets, visit “Danny at ECS” on Amazon or go to www.edu-cs.com for a complete listing of available support. You may also contact me directly: dhuffman@educationcareerservices.com.

See YOU at the workshops!

Danny Hufman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC
Follow Me on Twitter #dannyatecs
Blogsite: https://careerbreakout.wordpress.com
Education Career Services: www.edu-cs.com
West Orlando News Online, Event and Career Columnist: http://westorlandonews.com

Career Performance Excellence

With a New Year and an opportunity to partner with seasoned career professionals trained to “equip and empower YOU to become an excellent employee,” today promises to be a new beginning. Christian HELP, Central Florida Employment Council (CFEC), and Education Career Services has partnered with one goal in mind: YOUR CAREER SUCCESS.

cfji-logo InitiaveThe goal of the Central Florida Jobs Initiative (CFJI) is intensive: To connect employers with qualified and job-ready candidates.

For those unemployed, underemployed, and/or recently graduated, this FREE six-session program has the potential to lift you well above other candidates. For those serious about career progression and career satisfaction, make the call today at 407.796.3650 or visit www.cfji.org for details.

The six interactive modules address recruiting and retention challenges with which human resource professionals encounter, developing techniques to your advantage. Throughout each workshop, you will be introduced to a wide range of career strategies and applications proven to enrich your personal and professional development.

Highlights of the six complementary classes are as follows:

Creating Your Job Search Plan: Addresses effective job search and career management strategies as well as common techniques to overcome the psychological effects when faced with unemployment.

Crafting Your Cover Letter and Resume
: No doubt the key to finding a job is a well-written, value-filled resume and cover letter. These career documents are essential to find long-term and meaningful employment, but yet so many job seekers don’t know what they are—let alone how to write them. Our second of six workshops cover the basic and advanced methods behind writing an effective resume and cover letter, and also provides examples and tips along to the way to YOUR career success.

Networking in the Digital Age: According to a recent study conducted by Harvard University sociologist Mark Granovetter, 74.5% of all jobs come through networking. No doubt networking is a key in success but how does one network effectively? Series three is an ideal guide to get you on the right networking path, and keep you there!

Job Search Tactics: This fourth of six workshops takes you through each step of a digital job search. Everything from selecting an online job search site, creating an online profile, to uploading a resume is covered. Furthermore, alternative methods such as social networking, job fairs, and walk-in’s are detailed.

Interviewing and Impressions: The fifth workshop breaks the interview process into a series of steps. We start with preparation for the big day, move onto the interview, and then cover the follow up. Let this interview workshop be your guide to acing every aspect of the interview by realizing the many values and contributions you offer an employer.

Performance Excellence: The final workshop walks you throughout your 90-day review period and beyond. Be prepared to learn the meaning and process of on-boarding, develop conflict resolution skills, and examine the best practices to give and receive feedback. Furthermore, you’ll be introduced to concepts such as how to handle confidential information and contractual agreements.

Are you ready to be a superstar on the job? Here’s what’s required:

*  Must have a minimum of a high school diploma or GED
*  Must be eligible to work in the United States
*  Must have reliable transportation
*  If applicable, must have reliable childcare
*  Must clear a criminal background

Not just for the individual seeking their career competitive advantage, the Central Florida Jobs Initiative is geared to provide employers with well-trained industry-diverse candidates.

The success of the Central Florida Jobs Initiative depends on partnerships with local organizations and community partners. Local organizations and community partners are offered several ways to participate in the following ways
:
*  Providing mentors for new hires
*  Module training
*  Facility usage
*  Mock interviewing

In addition, the Central Florida Jobs Initiative provides a great candidate resource from which to identify, interview, and possibly select to fill your employment openings. If you are interested in participating, please contact Norma M. Perez at (407) 760-3938 or Michael Johnson at (407) 796-3650 for details.

To learn more, go to www.cfji.org for a complete Central Florida Jobs Initiative overview.

Education Career Services is proud to partner with Christian HELP and play an instrumental role in developing and publishing cutting-edge career management material for the Central Florida Jobs Initiative as well as thousands of job seekers across the United States. For those interested in career management courseware, full length books, or employment-targeted booklets, visit “Danny at ECS” on Amazon or go to www.edu-cs.com for a complete listing of available support. You may also contact me directly: dhuffman@educationcareerservices.com.

See YOU at the workshops!

Danny Hufman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC
Follow Me on Twitter #dannyatecs
Blogsite: https://careerbreakout.wordpress.com
Education Career Services: www.edu-cs.com
West Orlando News Online, Event and Career Columnist: http://westorlandonews.com

Company Connection

Over the past few weeks I’ve had the opportunity to meet career professionals from across the United States as well as beyond our boundaries during the APSCU and NACE conferences held in Las Vegas. One common theme among participating career professionals had to do with the methods one can one to “speak the right language” when responding to a job posting. In other words, what can one do to enhance a company connection and get called in for an interview?

Like I tell all of my clients, the resume and cover letter MUST detail, in a valuable and error-free fashion, what the employer is seeking, not what you want from the company. I know it sounds easy but the truth of the matter is YOU must take an active role if you want to succeed. Enough said as this is common sense; after all, who in their right mind would send a resume highlighting electrical skills for a bartender job posting? Certainly not you! With this said, time for company connection…

Rule #1: Make sure your cover letter and resume is targeting the right job posting. Yes, you guessed it, this means redoing your cover letter and resume for each job posting.

For those wanting to take the easy way out and decide to send a one-size-fitting all resume, think about the employer for a moment. Nothing like impressing a human resources professional like reading a template… NOT.

On a first-hand basis, when I receive a resume that I know was not tailored to the position, the candidate is automatically disqualified. In case you’re wondering, it’s easy to tell which are tailored and which are not… so don’t fool yourself.

Rule #2: Research the company (if possible) and incorporate relevant information (check out the mission statement) in your cover letter. For example, if you are interested in a position with a company who engages in community involvement, don’t forget to mention the volunteer work performed over the summer at the local animal shelter.

Rule #3: Take advantage of keywords and phrases from the job posting. One method of making sure you don’t forget to highlight what the company needs is to take advantage of a free online tool from tagcrowd.com. For those unfamiliar with this resource, this is your lucky day.

* Copy and paste the job posting into tagcrowd.com, change word redundancy to 3 (or more), and submit. The result will amaze you by displaying the most common words used within the posting. Once you have these high priority words at your disposal, incorporate those applicable to your skills and interest.

By following the above three rules, you will increase the odds of a company connection by speaking the right language. Not only will these rules assist you in being recognized as the right candidate, your interviewing skills will also improve (as you will now respond to questions based upon what the company wants… NOT what you want).

For those interested in guidelines, samples, and applications on how to improve your resume and cover letter, consider investing in the Career Intelligence Series job search library of cutting edge workbooks. Visit www.edu-cs.com or Google (search Danny at ECS) for more information and a complete listing.

Danny Huffman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC

Education Career Services
Follow me on Twitter: DannyatECS

Career Breakout: Interview Preparation (Part Two of Two)

A few days ago we rested in the middle of number one. For a quick recap, here’s the list once more:

  1. Do your homework
  2. Know where you fit and why
  3. Be ready to ask questions as well as answer them

If you happened to miss our last discussion, refer back to the previous submission and get caught up in a hurry. As it is, let’s examine how company personality can be used for your advantage as you head into an interview.

We left off after highlighting company research resources available at your fingertips. Use these same resources to learn about key people in the organization, particularly the area you’re interviewing for. If you’ve been provided a contact in case you have questions, you might politely inquire as to the name or name(s) of the individuals you’ll be meeting in your interview and their titles within the firm.

Receptionists, administrative assistants, and HR personnel are very busy individuals often answering to and supporting a number of individuals in a company at once, so don’t make multiple calls to them or abuse the opportunity to communicate with them. Only call when you have gathered as much information as possible on your own. Make your inquiry short and polite, and thank them for their time and help, even if they can’t provide you the answers you’d hoped.

Career Tip #1: As a potential employee, learning as much as you can about the company is the only way you can successfully accomplish number two on our list.

Let’s take a look at number two on our list of how to prepare for an interview, “Know where you fit and why.”

Now that you’ve studied up on your future employer, have an idea how big the firm is (a team of five family members or an international conglomerate of 50,000), what’s important to them, and gained a sense of what they value and what kind of culture exists within the firm, you’ve got the information you need to figure out where you fit and why.

Career Tip #2: Being prepared shows confidence, initiative, and career readiness.

Know how to respond to expected questions such as “What led you to apply to this firm,” “What strengths do you bring to this position,” and even “Where do you see yourself in five year?”

While you can answer these questions without knowing anything about the company, consider how much better you’ll look as a knowledgeable and prepared candidate. Packed with information, imagine how much more clearly you can make your case for your being THE RIGHT INDIVIDUAL for the job if you can answer common (and no-so common) questions with specificity, using the information you gleaned in Step one!

You can probably see how Step one has also set you up to “Be ready to ask questions as well as answer them” (taking us to number three on the list).

Everyone arrives at an interview expecting to answer questions about themselves and their qualifications. And everyone interviewing for a specific position likely has very similar answers to one another (after all, you’re all up for the same job!). Visualize what that’s like for the interview, though. It’d be like watching the same scene from a movie over and over and over again.

How can you make the interview experience different for the interviewer? How can you stand out from the others interviewing with the same credentials, and same background as you have?

In addition to being able to give specific answers to your interviewer’s questions–answers that demonstrate you’ve done your homework, know about the company and know where you might fit in the company–you can also ask great questions when given the opportunity.

Very often, at the end of an interview, you’ll be asked “Are there any questions we can answer for you?” Be ready! Ask questions that help you learn even more about the company and about the position for which you’re applying. Working relationships go both ways so think of asking the right questions as an opportunity to interview the company. After all, you need to decide whether working for them is right for your future.

In effect, you’re both interviewing one another. So, when given the opportunity, have two or three great questions ready to ask that demonstrate that you’ve studied the company, care about the job, and are seriously interested in whether you’re the right fit for the position. These questions give you one last opportunity to SHOW your future employer who you are.

I know you can’t imagine NOT wanting a job! But sometimes it’s important to know that you can work for a firm and be happy.

I hope you find these suggestions helpful as you prepare for your interview!  Good luck!

Presented by Kathryn Broyles, Ph.D.,
Program Director of General Studies
American Public University/American Military University

Thank you once again Kathryn, your advice is greatly appreciated. For those interested in learning more about American Public University/American Military University where they are expanding access to higher education with more than 100 affordable degrees and certificates to prepare students for service and leadership in a diverse and global society, visit their website at www.apus.edu.

Danny Huffman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC
EducationCareerServices.com
Got Twitter? Follow me @DannyatECS

Career Breakout: Tattooed, what’s the big deal?

Questions keep coming in from our audience; your voices do not fall upon deaf ears. Providing you an advantage, career professionals across the United States will be offering recommendations throughout our continuing Career Breakout series, where YOU control the question.

I have tattoos and each time I go to an interview, people stare at them and I can’t get a job offer. What’s the big deal with a few tattoos?

No doubt about it, the use of tattoo art is increasing. WARNING: Tattoos may be dangerous to your career. According to the top career management associations, tattoos are not always a welcome site on prospective employees. I know you are simply expressing yourself in an innocent fashion but not everyone knows that.

Through the employer’s eye, let’s uncover some of the stereotypes associated with ink on skin.

True or not:

  • Those with tattoos are rebels, not team players
  • Hiring executives link ink with gang membership
  • Non-tattooed employees are uncomfortable around those with tattoos
  • Customers become intimidated when approached by inked representatives
  • Hiring executives often associate tattoos with individuals who have been in prison
  • Companies dealing with face-to-face clients prefer conservative looking employees

The above perceptions many companies (especially conservative organizations) hold as truths and will be a factor during the hiring process.

Regarding our original question, though tattoos may not be a big deal to me, to many they are. As mentioned in a previous submission, perception and attitude are directly related. Thus, if the hiring manager sitting across the table holds any prejudices (and we all do), you may be doing yourself a disservice by showcasing ink.

Another consideration may be more difficult to swallow. Perhaps your qualifications are not as strong as other candidates or your interviewing skills are lacking. Either factor could be the reason there have been no job offers. Ultimately, to blame tattoos may be your way of rationalizing?

There are multiple factors why individuals do not make it beyond the initial interview process. Perhaps it’s not the ink but something else. On a side note, it is not uncommon for hiring managers to eliminate candidates due to bad teeth, body odor, un-polished shoes, a gut feeling, or a fishy handshake. The list goes on and on. My advice to you is to receive an objective career evaluation from a career coach. Asking a friend or family member is nice, but knowing the truth is nicer.

If you have any questions for our career professionals, we are ready.

Interested in learning more about Education Career Services library of career resources, books, and workbooks, visit our website or go to Amazon.com (search Huffman at ecs).

Danny Hufman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC
www.educationcareerservices.com
Twitter: @dannyatecs

New Year / New Attitude

With the coming of a new year we can finally say that things are going to get a little better. But then again, economists and job trend analysts are about as fickle as the weather. Fortunately, each one of us has the power to develop professionally no matter what storms may come. As a career coach, an author of over a dozen career books and single-target workbooks, and a seasoned hiring manager/CEO, I can honestly state that most career progressions and/or new employee hiring is directly related to the candidate’s attitude being projected.

What does this mean for YOU? Glad you asked…

In today’s tight employment market, companies are seeking candidates who can carry more than the typical eight-hour load. You heard it, today is all about “what can you do for the company, now!” Herein resides the foundation of this article: selling YOUR knowledge, skills, and abilities in a confident and progressive manner. Easier said than done? Not really.

Quite bluntly, attitude and perception (the way others see and define you) are directly related and is a powerful tool to construct or destroy relationships, personal and professional. Taking it to back to the New Year and a new (or improved) career, the manner in which the package (YOU) is presented weighs heavily on the result.

One thing we should make initially clear to candidates lacking a great deal of career-related experience, rarely do the interview, job, and/or promotion go to the most qualified… more often than not; offers go to the individual with the right attitude.

How to enhance perception positively depends on how you package and distribute attitude. Let’s take a quick look at three mediums career seekers use and how attitude influences perception.

Informational Interviews: Defined as an informal discussion with the intent of gaining job information from an individual in your field of interest.

  • Proper attitude is upbeat, confident, respectful of the advice and time given, well      researched—asking relevant questions, and always professional.
  • Improper attitude can be defined by being pushy (asking for a job), irrelevant, sloppy, not  timely (being late or overextending), entitled, and non-appreciative.Under this example (and I’ve had plenty of both), attitude guides reaction and ultimate consequence… but you know this.

Career Documents (resume and cover letter): Defined as the primary medium used to formally exchange information related to a specific position.

  • Proper attitude is displayed by keeping information relevant, error-free, confident      (quantifying accomplishments), proper spacing (plenty of white space but not too much), and written professionally.
  • Improper attitude  is defined by taking a lazy road (using templates or self-propagating formats), using illegible fonts (or too small), filled with errors (could be an automatic deal-breaker), and is passive by nature.Under this example, a hiring manager gets a “gut” feeling as to the type      of person the author is. In other words, displaying improper techniques rings bells of keep away, even if you happen to be the most qualified candidate.

Formal Interview: Recognized to be the place where qualifications are confirmed. Most importantly, this is the setting defining how you “fit in” with the company.

Taken from experience, face-to-face attitude and perception never meant so much as during a formal interview. Naturally if the first two elements discussed above are out of sync, a formal interview will never be offered.

  • Proper attitude:  timely, respectful, firm handshake, asking the right questions  (well-researched), listening and responding directly to each question, behaving in a courteous manner, responding professionally, recognizing all parties involved (including the receptionist), and sending a handwritten follow up to be sent via snail mail.
  • Improper attitude is reflected by being late, loud, disrespectful, diverting questions,      sounding rehearsed, lacking eye contact, offering a limp handshake, not researching the company, being distracted, reeking of smoke, not offering any solid examples as to how you will create an immediate value, and oozing of arrogance.If you are currently employed, the importance of perception cannot go understated. To encourage promotions and/or job stability, take advantage and express the right attitude hour in and hour out. With downsizing and shrinking budgets, peers, managers, corporate executives all are eager to fill positions with individuals recognized as problem solvers. Candidate attitudes and the perception of others play a huge factor in shaping career success, an often ignored fact held by many.

    The New Year promises to be one of continued adjustment, personally and professionally. Irrelevant of your circumstance, the manner in which you expresses attitude directly correlates to the picture viewed by others. Now is a perfect time to reflect on this year’s goals, develop a plan to achieve each objective, and reinforce the value of a positive attitude. If you have not bought into the fact that attitude and perception is the foundation of success, try it for three months and prove me wrong. Consider yourself as being double dared. Interested in purchasing Education Career Services career resources, books, and workbooks, visit our website or Amazon.com (search Danny Huffman at education career services).

    Danny Hufman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC
    www.educationcareerservices.com
    Twitter: @dannyatecs