Tag Archives: second chance

2CU Programs Ready to Roll

2nd Chance University is a non-profit organization focusing on youth and adults who victoryhave stumbled. Presently we are reaching out to those with a strong desire to make their community safer by offering youths and young adults an alternative to incarceration. This is where we need your help to implement effective programs in a partnership capacity.

Simply put, our 3, 6, and 18-month life-changing programs work, are scalable, and are cost effective.

Through the guidance of criminal justice administrators, facilitators, parole officers, inmates and parolees, 2nd Chance University brings intensive and interactive workshops for three audiences:

1. Youth Reintegration and Empowerment offering the 14 – 17 year old who has fallen off their path a proactive method to regain Commitment, Hope, and Empowerment. This program works in unison with brick and mortar facilities and is customized to parallel with academic goals and objectives of the facility and state.

2. Adult Alternatives to Incarceration allowing the 17 – 24 year old low-level offender to reestablish their path to freedom and success. This program affords Judges and District Attorneys to have an option from incarceration for those who have made a mistake.

3. Adult pre- and post-release brings reality front and center. Constructed by former convicts who have been through pre- and post-release programs, game-playing is not part of the equation. There are no more effective programs to show convicts what it takes to stay on the path, to secure and keep a job, and to become a productive part of the community.

  • Each program follows a similar core format:
    Turn-key ready
    Hard print and/or digital friendly
    Eighteen book courseware with an additional facilitator guide
    Individualized train-the-trainer two-day seminar held at our local headquarters in Sanford, Florida, or can be brought to your facility for group advantage.

Personally going through release camps and living the life, many of our contributors know there are no other programs as effective, interactive, and tangible than what is presented by 2nd Chance University.

Our classroom setting in Sanford, Florida handles up to 26 students and is also used for facilitator training workshops.

At your convenience, call for a deeper understanding of what and who 2nd Chance University is and how joining forces will build a better tomorrow, today.

Danny Huffman
407-878-0474
dhuffman@2ndChanceUniversity.org

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2nd Chance University: We…

2nd Chance University has lived its design, writes about what we know concerning our years of empirical findings and shares what works by applying those years of experience living within the criminal justice system.  

Our proprietary methods for altering potential criminal sentences, as well as helping those who have been sentenced to incarceration, builds on a structured methodology which allows those in pretrial and those leaving detention and incarceration to fit into society as a productive citizen.  

Each justice involved person, including Juveniles, may find identity, significance, and purpose in life and to the values their social environment offers. 2nd Chance University saves money, reduces recidivism and helps build communities by Educating, Empowering and Employing the justice involved.  

We recognize employment is a key factor in helping the justice-involved. 2CU is built upon behavioral modification, trauma centered therapy and holistic approaches to breaking the revolving door of incarceration.

Within three years of being released, 60% of ex-prisoners re-offend and 52% are re-incarcerated, according to a study published in 2014. The rate of recidivism is so high in the United States that most inmates who enter the system are likely to reenter within a year of their release.

Therefore the lock them up and throw away the key methodology is not working as can be seen by the percentage of people going back to prison. 2nd Chance University gives the justice-involved a solution to this problem. We teach them to learn, earn, and stay out.

Our program addresses the haunting effects of trauma, felt and witnessed horrible experiences attached to their environment. By addressing these issues we uncover the reasoning for many of the justice involved who exhibit a lack of empathy. Therefore the use of Looking Glass Self Theory helps them understand their situation and resonates a new meaning in their life as how to view the social constructs of society in a different and hopeful manner.

The team at 2nd Chance University relies on proven concepts in order to break this revolving door of recidivism and the continuous cycle of poverty exemplified by incarceration. Our system has been proven and the principals of our program are walking examples of successful reintegration.

For individuals, organizations, and/or institutions dedicated to transforming the world, we are always looking for support and partnerships. Give me a call (407-878-0474) or email (dhuffman@2ndChanceUniversity.org) for insight.

Danny Huffman

President Trump Signs First Step Act into Law,

Just signed (presented by The Council of State Governments Justice Center Staff):
President Trump signed into law bipartisan legislation today to reform the federal prison system. The First Step Act, which passed the U.S. Senate 87-12 and the House 358-36, will usher in significant changes to federal sentencing laws as well as improvements to programs that aim to reduce recidivism and provide support to people who are involved in the criminal justice system…
As a non-profit focusing on keeping our communities safe by educating, empowering, and employing those who have struggled, we are encouraged by the latest signature (and also encourage your full read

Second Chance… Think Again.

“To say is not to do. To do is to say.”
Duck

For those who do not know Duck, he is simply a man.
A man who spent 13 years incarcerated for a crime he did not commit
but still walks a path defined by society
unwilling to offer second chances.

We’ve heard it many times and at many levels: “Everybody deserves a second chance.” But what does that really mean? Does society truly offer second chances? Do you, really?

Duck is not a bitter man.
He is simply a man wishing to live his life peacefully
and with equal opportunity.

From employment to housing to EVERYTHING in between, rare are the few offering second chances. Perhaps it is because we all have our own lives to live and who needs “fear” to be in the equation if possible… am I right ladies? Don’t think I need to explain the last line or justify what most think.

For the person, organization, potential employer, and the hypocrite pretending otherwise, stop saying and begin doing. Give others, all others no matter their race or stumbled background, a chance to be the person he or she is meant to be. It’s pretty simple, stopping the madness begins by stopping the talk and doing the do.

Duck is man refusing defeat.
He is simply a man who has been escorted off jobs
in front of crowds because a crime he didn’t commit.

Empowering and employing begins with YOU, not by what you say but by what you do.

I ask one thing from you: Be true to yourself and those around you. Stop the bull, keep what you say real, and if you don’t believe (and live the life) in second chances, stop pretending you do.

Duck, like the millions who have stumbled, will rise to the challenge of humbling himself every step along the journey…
with or without you.

2nd Chance University is a non-profit designed for those who have stumbled within our justice system as they regain their Commitment, Hope, and Empowerment.

Duck is a man offering importance.
His experience, struggles, and story is threaded throughout 2nd Chance University’s programs inspiring those
who have also stumbled.

We are seeking partnerships to bring our programs to communities across the nation. If you work with or know of organizations, work force centers, penal institutions, and/or judges and district attorneys committed to changing people’s path, bring it on. Together we can change the world, one person at a time.

Danny Huffman
407-878-0474
dhuffman@2ndChanceUniversity.org

 

Journey to an NP, Part 2

If you have not checked out the previous submission, you may feel a bit out-paced. Either way, here goes the second part as the journey to a Non Profit continues…

Since 2012 I’ve expanded our non-profit to support three justice-involved categories:

  • Youth reintegration and empowerment
  • Adult alternatives to incarceration
  • Pre- and post- release from incarceration

Six years later, our 4-month, 18-book, series/interactive workshops, are launching mainly because this once 16-year old softball player saw people in La Tuna as peoplenot as monsters… just people who made a mistake and needs to regain balance and Hope.

Over the years, this journey has had a personal cost of over six figures… the amount returned to cover? Zero… not one cent.

Worth it? You tell me, would you sacrifice years and over six figures with only Hope to make a positive difference in lives, families, and the world?

In this regard, will share participant journeys and how their lives change as we grow.

We are a 501 (C) (3) on the brink of great things… let me know if you would like to share in this journey; your insight, contacts, support, and donations are appreciated.

2nd Chance University is a non-profit designed for our youth as well as our adult population who have stumbled to regain their Commitment, Hope, and Empowerment.

If you chose to share or support, email me directly at dhuffman@2ndChanceUniversity.org and if you or a family member played softball years ago while at La Tuna, thank you for letting me into your world.

Danny Huffman
Founder
dhuffman@2ndChanceUniversity.org
321-972-8919
2ndChanceUniversity.org

America: Land of the (In)visible

Writing provided by Duck who spent 13 years incarcerated; now finding a home as contributor and facilitator/trainer with 2nd Chance University, a non-profit dedicated to those who have stumbled.

For those who have been (or are currently) justice-involved, being invisible occupies a rather peculiar stance with even more atypical consequence.

For those not justice-involved, imagine a world where eye contact is not allowed, no soul searching or glimpsing into the spirit of the silenced number striding side by side.

Living behind bars means no identity other than 6 or 7 digits surrounding his or her every move. Think ab out how your sense of identity would be without a name and with an objectified history defining your Looking Glass Self theory.

For those without a justice-involved scratch or dent, take a look in the mirror, strip the reflective image of who/what you think you see, and then wipe away all of you with a single stretch. From this day forward, in place of what you thought you saw moments ago, resides a blemished blur.

In accordance to being invisible, for the next 24 hours, there can be no eye contact, there can be no talk without directly being told you have permission to speak, there can be no mobility beyond set geographic boundaries, there can be no choice, no smiles (this will be seen as a sign of weakness), there can be no friends, no companionship, no nothing (sorry for the poor grammar).

Imagine, for these 24 hours, when people looked at you, they saw something less than human, something not worthy of respect, something not deserving of consideration, empathy, or a second chance. Imagine how these emotions and actions will toy with your mind and sense of self-worth not just for the moment, but for your lifetime (and your families).

Imagine that even after this 24-hour experience, time kept on and you were forever defined as less than human.

Truth is, for those who are justice-involved, rightly or wrongly, he or she will never wash their skin of past sins, society won’t let them, lenders won’t let them, employers won’t let them, and, in most cases, YOU won’t let them.

What does it mean to be invisible? There’s no such concept as no matter who you are, others see and define based upon pre-conceived misconceptions supporting personal agendas and deficiencies.

Is America the land of hope, of understanding, of second chances? Do I really need to answer that? Perhaps now is the time for America to be.

2nd Chance University is a non-profit designed for our youth as well as our adult population who have stumbled to regain their Commitment, Hope, and Empowerment.

I welcome your stories to be added into our series. If you chose to share or support, email me directly at dhuffman@2ndChanceUniversity.org.

Danny Huffman
Founder, Journeyman
321-972-8919

Trauma Informed Care, Yesterday to Today

Being a non-profit working with young and old adults involved within the criminal justice system, we hear the term Trauma Informed Care more often than not. As a matter of fact, the term, especially when dealing with alternatives to incarceration, our criminal justice system, and effective reintegration, is in the limelight right now. According to those in the know:

Trauma Informed Care is an organizational structure and treatment framework that involves understanding, recognizing, and responding to the effects of all types of trauma.

I remember growing up and how the word trauma was tagged (exclusively) to a military setting. No doubt, heading off to war can (and often will) directly affect the individual; of that there is little dispute. Way back when, it was rare that anyone not directly involved with the military was recognized as shouldering post-traumatic stress.

Unfortunately, family members left behind were often forgotten about or brushed to the side when it came to trauma… out of sight… their voice was rarely heard.

Jumping from childhood to well into adulthood, the consequence of trauma has been expanded to those outside of the military to include individuals indirectly involved in the incident or event. With such an expansion recognized, recovery is being addressed in a more effective manner… no more out of sight… their voice will be heard.

By today’s standards, traumatic experiences requiring care ranges from the obvious to the not-so-obvious. When it comes to our vulnerable youth and the effects of trauma, the world, neighborhood, and home can create an ever-lasting impression on the heart, mind, and soul; without proper care, these youth are at risk.

Beneath the trauma inducing umbrella are events such as:

Natural disaster
Death of a loved one
Being in a car accident
Child witnessing home abuse
Family member going to prison
Loud noises, gun shots being heard
Shootings and/or neighborhood fighting
Child being the victim of abuse, physical and/or emotional

The above is not all-inclusive but should give you an idea as to what we are dealing with.

On a personal level, the following happened years ago, which, if handled incorrectly, could have changed the path of two very young boys:

When my two boys were just three and four years of age, I purchased two living ducklings as an Easter present (before you panic, we lived on a farm so this was normal activity). My boys were in total awe at the new addition and insisted the ducks stayed in the house. I allowed.

On the second night, the new addition remained inside and in a cardboard box like the night before. After much quacking and smelling of duck poop, around 4:00 am, I placed the cardboard box outside, just within reach of the door. Unfortunately the night was a bit too cold and the ducks did not make it.

My boys woke to the sound of silence as they stepped out to an unexpected event. They both were very upset, shed tears, and did not understand what had happened. That morning, I sat the boys down and explained in a calm and empathetic way what had happened. Over the next few days we had gentle and sensitive talks about it and before long, all was fine.

Though insignificant in comparison, if handled without care and empathy, the event could have made a rippling psychological scar of one or both of my boys.

If a traumatic event happens to someone in your life, do know there are general things one can do to minimize lifelong effects. In my situation outlined above, I remained patient and understanding, allowing deep and meaningful discussions (even though the boys were very young, they deserved respect, a voice, warmth, and empathy).

Simply being there is the first step, as for second and third steps, we’ll review what the experts in the field suggest in articles to come.

To help all of us progress, I welcome your stories to be added into our series.

If you chose to share, email me directly at dhuffman@2ndChanceUniversity.org.

Danny Huffman,
Founder and Journeyman
2nd Chance University