Career Breakout: E-Resume Basics

“I’m new to the whole online job search thing. I’ve been told I need to make an ‘e resume’, separate from my own, to be used on the Internet. I have no idea what an e resume is, I only have my normal paper copy… help!”
-Krista Lovette

This week we’re answering a question that people ask very often. What is an e resume?

An e resume, short for electronic resume, is an online representation of your already existing paper resume. Unlike your paper resume, however, e resumes contain none of the eye-catching ‘fluff’.

E-Resume tip: Since many electronic platforms do not transfer many of the graphics properly, it is wise to play it safe and stick to the basics.

When going electronic, keep your document reader-friendly. In other words, keep away from fancy layouts, wingdings, and graphics.

I know you’re thinking: “Why go through all the trouble of eliminating everything that makes your eye-catching resume stand out? After all, the point of a resume is to display your unique value… right?”

Yes, all of that is true, but when you send a resume to an employer online, you want to make sure they receive it properly, that it looks and reads professional, and you highlight the many skills and contributions you offer in a way that will entice the reader to give you a call.

Different computers–heck, different programs–read information differently. Have you ever tried to copy and paste a document on your computer only to find your information becomes scrambled and out of place? If so, you know exactly what I’m talking about.

By utilizing just a few simple rules and keeping it simple, electronic resumes are your solution to avoiding any reader-friendly problems when an employer receives your resume. Keeping it simple also makes your documents compatible with practically every word processor in existence.

Electronic tip: Make sure and include key words and key phrases in your documents as your material will most likely go through an electronic tracking system… companies often eliminate resumes before looking at them if the electronic tracking system does not pick up industry-specific words.

Okay, so your documents may look plain and boring, but remember the point of an electronic resume isn’t to make yourself stand out, it’s to ensure an employer is able to read your resume when it’s absolutely necessary. That’s why we recommend you have at least two resumes: your standard paper resume and a stripped down electronic resume to go along with it.

As Krista mentioned, e resumes are great for online job search sites such as Monster, Careerbuilder, and Indeed, allowing you to upload and share your resume online with employers.

If you would like our career experts to address specific questions or issues related to your career development and success, reach out by using the comment box.

For those interested in cutting-edge career books to guide you along your journey, visit www.edu-cs.com or go to Amazon and search Danny at ECS for a listing of available material.

Written by Brandon Hayhurst
www.EducationCareerServices.com
Got Twitter? Shadow us @dannyatecs

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Career Breakout: Where are the jobs?

Over the past few months more and more people throughout the Greater Orlando area have been writing in with one basic question: “Where are the jobs?” Though there are no job-warehouses impatiently waiting for your application, rest assured, companies ARE hiring.

Unfortunately for most, jobs are NOT growing on a tree where all you have to do is pluck the one you want as you passively stroll on by. Taking a passive approach does not do you or your career success a favor.

For the record, I consider an individual putting in less than four hours a day pursuing for a job to be taking a passive approach. How about a quick survey of sorts, raise your hand if the following refers to you: I spend less than two hours a day on my career campaign? If you raised your hand, congratulations as your complacency will allow you take advantage of unemployment longer than your aggressive counterpart… do you feel lucky!

As many career management studies indicate, most people undergoing a career transition spends an average of 3.5 hours daily looking for employment.

After looking at this morning’s job classified in the Orlando Sentinel, I came away quite under-whelmed as the amount of jobs were an embarrassment… so glad President Obama’s job stimulus program is working the same way most politicians work… not at all (oops, did I say that out loud?).

Despite political efforts to dampen the field, companies are hiring. For those living under a rock, companies skipped rope and have jumped away from the traditional method of newspapers to another medium. So, where are jobs to be found?

Did you know: The top career management associations in the United States suggest that only 20% to 30% of all job openings are listed traditionally; meaning that 70% to 80% of all jobs are not advertised!

The above statistic is bad news for the passive job seeker but GREAT news for the aggressive job seeker. The aggressive job seeker works at finding work six to eight hours daily and is finding payday (on average) four to six months quicker than the second-handers (any Ayn Rand fans out there?).

If job listings are not advertised, why did they leave and where are they?

Let’s tackle the first question first and understand why companies turned away from traditional advertising. Though the main reason is obvious, I’ll say it anyway: MONEY. The cost of print advertising has skyrocketed to the point of absurdity (even more than the price of gas—go figure).

In addition to the increased cost factor, demographics come into play. Newspapers cater to a limited area and to a limited audience. In order for companies to be competitive, they must attract and keep cutting-edge employees from across the globe. No longer is a village good enough (sorry Hillary, this is not child-rearing); companies on the move reach across village lines, state lines, and country lines to gain their competitive advantage.

With cost high and reach low, companies are taking advantage of low-cost methods to attract high quality candidates via two main avenues (both of which reside under the networking umbrella):

* Employee referrals: Companies enjoy this method of finding quality hires as it is cost effective while empowering current workers who now play an active role in the hiring process.
* Digital networking sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter has become the number one place for companies to secure help.

How does the shift from traditional advertising to a digital and employee referral system affect you? To be blunt, if you want to find your perfect job, networking is the key though you must maximize your efforts. Not to worry, we’ll review networking techniques as well as some of the do’s and don’ts in upcoming articles.

No doubt about it: In this day and age, an online presence is important. In fact, in some professions, not having an online presence is an immediate disqualifier.

Think about it the suspicion: If the hiring manager enters a name in a search engine and nothing comes up, he or she may wonder several things:

●  Why doesn’t their name show up?
●  Are they behind on the latest trends?
●  Do they not know how to use the Internet to its fullest?
●  What are they trying to hide?

Time to draw a line between professional networking and social networking. Professional networking is a place for business related discussions, not so
much social networking. Social networking, however, IS ALSO a place for business related discussions as well as personal.

Warning! Everything you do, post, or say on the Internet is fair game for employers.

Data triangulation is part of the hiring process… hiring managers are not just going to check the references on your reference document, they’ll do a Google search and more detail searches as part of your background check.

If you would like our career experts to address specific questions or issues related to your career development and success, reach out by using the comment box.

For those interested in cutting-edge career books to guide you along your journey, visit www.edu-cs.com or go to Amazon and search Danny at ECS for a listing of available material.

Danny Hufman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC
www.EducationCareerServices.com
Got Twitter? Shadow me @dannyatecs

Career Breakout: Bridge Building/Burning

I was recently asked what steps, if any, one should take when leaving a current job.

Without hesitation, the manner in which you leave a company can (and will) haunt you. Just ask Dwight about the negative consequence when requesting (or demanding) movement. Quite bluntly, there are right ways (professional courtesy takes the lead) and not-so right ways (temper tantrums and threats) to leaving… much depends if you want to build or burn the bridge you’ve worked hard to construct.

Tip of the decade: BEFORE you consider leaving, make sure you’ve considered how it will affect your employer, your career footprint, and that leaving is what you really want to do.

Rule #1: Don’t make a rash or emotional decision

Unless you are put in an extreme moral or ethical dilemma, or an illegal activity, consider holding off at least 24 hours until finalizing your decision. Making hasty judgments based upon what might be a minor situation typically is not in your best interest.

The value of holding off until the following day gives you time to cool down, think rationally, and discuss the pros and cons of making a life-changing decision. For clarity, be sure and review the situation and your reasoning with a close peer or family member (specifically your life partner) in person… not over Facebook or Twitter.

After the emotional dust settles and, if you are determined to part ways, consider two possible paths and decide which works for you. Here’s my take on what NOT to do versus what you should do.

Here’s what you should NOT do when quitting your job:
* Do the Dwight (samples of his bad behavior available upon request)
* Ignore your responsibility by not showing up to work when you are scheduled to be there
* Text or use Twitter to let your boss know you are leaving
* Yell, blame, or use nasty language while walking out the door
* Blasting your boss or company on the Internet

Now that you know a few of the things NOT to do, let’s take a look at a few things you should do:
* Possess a positive attitude and professional demeanor
* Develop a well-written letter of resignation, highlighting positive things about the company, the people, and the products/services
* Give a minimum of a two-week notice
* Consider how your leaving will affect the company and your co-workers
* Continue working hard and productively up to (and including) your last day

Rule #2: Display professionalism at all times

Changing jobs rarely is easy. For the employer, it takes time to locate and train new employees and this could mean a loss of revenue (if a sales person leaves) or it could mean a disruption of service (if a technician or office personnel calls it quits). Without proper notification and time for a replacement, you put your previous boss and company in jeopardy.

Rule #3: Slamming the former boss/company could dunk your career

Employers appreciate employees willing to do the right thing upon departure and typically will “pay it forward” in the form of a solid professional reference. According to employer surveys, business references have increased dramatically as future employers value the opinion of former supervisors. How do you think a potential employer would react if he or she contacted your former supervisor and nothing but unkind words were shared? Thought you would agree with me.

Still thinking about NOT doing the right thing, take a look at how Orlando Magic’s Dwight Howard is handling his attempt to leave the Amway… just saying. Ultimately, the choice, manner, and consequence are up to you.

Looking for sample resignation letters as well as additional information about this or any other career-related topic, use the comment field and our team of certified writers and coaches will take care of you. For those interested in cutting-edge career books to guide you along your journey, visit www.edu-cs.com or go to Amazon and search Danny at ECS for a listing of available material.

Danny Hufman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC
www.EducationCareerServices.com
Got Twitter? Shadow me @dannyatecs