Tag Archives: career

Hire a Felon? Say it ain’t so

I hire those who have stumbled… but there are two fundamental conditions.

Are you scissors, rock, or paper?

Before pointing fingers and saying not fair one group has conditions while another does not, stop and think about it for a moment while we side-step at the positives and risks when hiring an ex-convict.

The justice-involved

  • Appreciate the opportunity and (more often than not) do not take the opportunity for granted
  • Develop loyalty quicker than those who have yet to be humbled
  • Have more to gain through employment; enhances self-esteem while keeping their PO off their back
  • Want freedom and know the consequences of slipping, on and off the job
  • Work harder and with enthusiasm (in general) than those who can find employment without the banning box

A few risks worthy of consideration

  • Monthly morning or afternoon probation officer meeting
  • Additional training may be required
  • Worrying about what others may think or say
  • Confronting personal fears and prejudices on a daily basis… If I need to explain, denial is real
  • Is it safe or will I get robbed, raped, or killed… (while on this bullet, statistically speaking the chances of you getting any of the three is more likely to happen by those who have no arrests or convictions… in other words, it may be safer to hire an ex-convict over a slacker without a stumble

So easy to point fingers… we’ve all pointed so don’t get atop that high horse. Come to think of it, we’ve all done (or said) things which the justice system could have altered life as we know it… all of us. For those who claim otherwise, stop lying to yourself as no one believes you anyway.

Back to my initial line regarding two fundamental conditions… candidates must:

  • Make the choice to believe in their knowledge, skills, and abilities
  • Not play games… if you have to ask, don’t

As a hiring executive and business owner, hiring an ex-felon has always been a matter of choice.

In many companies there resides inherent prejudices against those who have stumbled (recall the box). Still, within the machine the inherent prejudices reside within the hiring manager.

Truth is, few care; few are willing to offer hope a chance. Honestly, do you give hope a chance or do you fake it?

I believe in hope, I believe in people, and I believe in second chances.

2nd Chance University partners with organizations/institutions dedicated to those who have stumbled. Our material and empowering workshops are about real people, real life, and real issues.

I welcome your stories to be added into our series. If you chose to share or support, email me directly. For those wishing to introduce 2CU and our programs into an organization, institution, or facility, please step forward; together we can make a difference.

Danny Huffman
407-878-0474
2nd Chance University
dhuffman@2ndChanceUniversity.org

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Job Expectations: What Employers Expect

Once a job offer has been accepted, you agree to the terms, conditions, salary, and expectations placed upon you.

woman and fire blog Jan 2015With acceptance comes expectations… over the next few weeks, we will be clarifying what exactly is expected from you. For today, the employer’s point of view will be simplified; truth is, you were hired not just to do the job, but to champion the company while being professional on and off site.

Doing the job: You were hired to get the job done. You may be the greatest chap in the world and perhaps even smooth-talked your way through the front door, but if you cannot deliver, the back door will soon feel your shadow. Take notes during training, stay late (on your time), research, do, whatever it takes to prove your employer made the right choice.

Scheduled hours: For many (if not most), being at your desk and ready to perform five minutes BEFORE your scheduled time is considered a sin. Latest scoop, employers expect you to be producing from jump. Producing does not mean making or waiting for coffee, running to the bathroom, gossiping, sitting in the parking lot, Facebooking, or any other non-work related function.

Last year I had to council an employee who constantly walked in the front door eight minutes after her scheduled time. In an attempt to justify daily tardiness, she explained how each morning she was in the parking lot, listening to a radio host while thinking about her work day. Unfortunately, until our chat, she felt the parking lot was an extension of the office.

Employers expect you to be functioning on the dot, this includes prior to departure. In other words, do not stretch down the final 15 minutes of your shift. If you must clean up, prep for the night out, look for recipes, or re-discover Facebook’s irrelevance, do it on your time… after your shift concludes.

Champion the company: Employers expect each employee to represent on and off the clock. Given the digital world, instant electronic gossiping, and social networking, what you do, what you say, and what you write will be reviewed not just by friends (and perfect strangers). Fair or not, it’s just the way it is.

We’ve just begun to examine job expectations from the employer’s perspective… oh, there’s so much more to consider. Not too worry, this month is dedicated to getting you in the know while making sure you do not make simple mistakes leading to confusion or termination. In case you’re wondering, the parking lot lady was terminated the following week; for some reason, she just couldn’t grasp this employer’s expectation.

If you have any questions or situations you would like to share, please send it in to me directly or go through the comment box.

To review and consider career development books and resources, including material designed specifically for those transitioning from military service, resume / cover letter construction, networking, and interview strategies as well as employment guidance for ex-felons visit www.edu-cs.com, www.CareerBreakOut.com, or www.2ndChanceUniversity.com.

Danny Huffman, MA, CEIP, CPRW, CPCC
dhuffman@edu-cs.com
Education Career Services: www.edu-cs.com
Career Break Out: www.CareerBreakOut.com